Why We Should Look at Ruins Like They're in Technicolor

The Washington Post, June 24, 2015

The past exists in our memory in gray, in marble. Greek temples, once painted, have been bleached by time. Old photographs are in black-and-white.

Because of this, we tend to imagine our forebears were more serious than we are, applying themselves dutifully to family and faith and the contemplation of eternal questions while we skitter around reading each other’s Facebook overshares and nurse hangovers and lose hours we’ll never get back watching E! TV. We always suspect modernity constitutes a decline from the past. We experience inner conflict: Drawn to silliness, to “pokes” and Buzzfeed and tiaras and dancing ’til the room blurs, we also hate the silliness in our natures, call it childish, seek to conquer it.

But is the contrast we imagine between the present and the past true? Or is it a trick? Read more ...